Category Archives: Maintenance

Dumping Gray and Black Tanks The Right Way

Before we started using our coach, I did tons of research on various topics. One theme was evident on the forums I read and videos I watched. Dump your tanks right so they don’t smell up your coach when you open the gate valve on your toilet.

I found this EXCELLENT video on dumping your tanks the right way and we have done this every time with great results. Doing this from the start can keep your coach from having that…smell.

Slide Maintenance

I mentioned in a previous post that we heard a very loud sound from the front, driver’s side slide while going to and returning from our trip to St. Augustine, FL in September. We made an appointment to have it looked at, but in the meantime, Amber called Winnebago and talked to a person that said it was a very common problem and we should find the YouTube video on lubricating the gibs in the slide mechanisms on either side of each slide.

I ordered the lubricant from Amazon and when it arrived followed the video’s instructions. Once I did that to all the slides, I noticed that bringing them in and out was much less noisy and a lot smoother. The real test would be driving to see if it made noise.

Today I drove Irving to get a couple of other issues taken care of at a dealership nearby and there was no noise at all. The ride was smooth and was very happy this appeared to work. If you are new, like us, make sure you add this to your maintenance list.

Faulty LED Replacement

Replacement LED Light

WARNING: WE TOOK EXTREME PRECAUTIONS BEFORE WORKING WITH THE ELECTRICAL IN OUR COACH. WE UNPLUGGED FROM THE 50 AMP RECEPTACLE AND SWITCHED OFF BOTH THE CHASSIS AND COACH BATTERIES. I ALSO TESTED THE WIRES I WAS GOING TO BE CUTTING WITH A VOLTAGE TESTER, MAKING SURE THERE WAS NO CURRENT. PLEASE BE SAFE WHEN WORKING ON ANYTHING ELECTRICAL IN YOUR COACH.

It’s a bit disconcerting when you have things go wrong with a brand new coach…well, any coach really. We started noticing that one of the LED lights near the dinette was flickering and sometimes did not light at all. Then, sometimes it seemed to work fine. A quick search on a couple of RV forums mentioned a particular model of LED light that had a bad batch where the soldering was not right. I suspected we had at least one of those lights, so I pulled the light assembly out of the roof and found the part number which matched the known bad batch.

I thought about making a service appointment to get it fixed, but as you may have already read in a previous post, I am not very happy with lead times for service appointments at Lazydays. I then thought about purchasing some new lights from Amazon, but I didn’t think it was right to have to buy a part that was defective.

So I ended up emailing the manufacturer and explained our issue. They took full responsibility for the bad batch and sent up not one, but two new LED light assemblies, which we got days after making the inquiry. In the meantime, another LED light right above our cooktop started acting funny, so it was a good thing they sent us two of them. The lights sat for a long time and then we noticed on our St. Augustine trip that the LED light in the half bath was acting up also. Geez…

When we got back from St. Augustine, I emailed the manufacturer again, explaining the situation and they said they would send more lights. I finally decided to get off my butt and replace the original two that were faulty, I was putting it off because they were “hardwired” into the wires in the ceiling with crimped, not screw, caps to keep the wires together. This means I had to cut the wires, strip them and then attach the new light assembly. I am not very handy, so I knew what to do, but just wasn’t confident.

I had my plan an it worked great. As you can see in the picture, I got the two faulty LEDs replaced in about 15 minutes. When the other lights come, I will definitely have the confidence to do it again.

Exercising A RV Generator

Cummins Onan 5500 Generator
I had picked up from various sources that running the coach generator was a good idea for at least an hour a month. Then I started reading the manual for our generator and discovered how important “exercising” an RV generator really is.

When you don’t use an RV generator regularly, moisture builds up and the system starts to degrade. For our Cummings Onan 5500 gas generator, it is recommended that it be run at a minimum of 50% capacity for two hours every four weeks. It is best to run the generator for one long rather than several small periods of time. This keeps the internal parts lubricated, gets moisture our of the system, and prevents what’s called varnishing.

We were worried that we would not be able to run the generator while at the storage lot, so Amber asked the management and they said it was ok. I have gone to the storage lot to check on Irving and while I was there the last two times, I ran the generator for over an hour each time with both air conditioning unit running. It was very necessary to run both A/C units since it was over 100 degrees in the coach when I arrived.

We are definitely learning these things as we go along. It helps to learn as much as you can about your particular RV so you can keep it running for many years.